Figure Session

A few random shots from a figure session in Philadelphia.

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The Grand Canyon #1

This past weekend, Kathryn, our friends Adam, Emily, and I drove out to a town called Williams in Arizona.  From there we took a train to the south ridge of the Grand Canyon.

Since I have ca 80 photos I want to post, I’ll have to do this in segments.

 

 

We began by driving out into the desert.  In my mind, the Mojave has always been a myth, yet there it was.  I imagined the setting of The Gunslinger (my favorite book) and this man trying to cross something of this scale with only his waterbags and his revolvers.

The tourguide on our train was named Morgan.  There should be a book about her.  Just before we got off at the park she said “Keep in mind that life is not about the number of breaths we take, but rather the moments that take our breath away.”

When we walked up to the rim, a little boy next to me said “It looks like a large photograph.”

A few moments later, Kathryn said it looks like a painting.

 

 

 

View from my Office

I took this photo last Thursday.  It has not been doctored in any way.  As I was leaving my office, there was this very strange light over Stamford.  It had been very windy the past two days.  This was the end of the winds and with it came this blue sky above mixed with clouds to the south and west (we’re looking toward NYC).

Vanity Fair Portraits: Photographs 1913–2008

I revisted the Los Angeles County Museum of Art this past weekend and had the opportunity to see the Vanity Fair show I refered to in my previous post.  AWESOME!  Honestly, this was my favorite exhibit of any show I can remember in recent history.  There are some permanent collections at the Met that I love, but this show was just the best all around photo exhibit I’ve seen.  Of course, in my mind, Annie Leibovitz’s work dominated the more recent era.  (You can read about her here on Wikipedia).  Most of these shots encompassed film celebrities, however, there were also some ones that I didn’t expect.  There’s a shot of Bush and his advisers in the Oval Office ca. the invasion of Iraq that looks eerily comfortable but has the undertone of “We just went to war.”  There’s also a shot that hit me, that I think was hers, of Ronald and Nancy Reagan dancing.  It was just this very poignant and tender moment.

In the earlier photos, there’s a shot of Monet months before his death… DH Lawrence, Picasso, Gloria Swanson, Hugh Grant.  I know I’m not hitting on the best, because all the photos were the best and I just can’t recall them all.

Anyway, if you find yourself in LA, go!

Here’s the link to the show: http://www.lacma.org/art/ExhibVF.aspx

Over and Out.

Neighborhood Shots – The Burning Tree

The past few weeks, I’ve been trying to go out at night, when the streets are wet, to take photos around my neighborhood (see the “photos” link under the Main Menu).  The past few nights I’ve been particularly anxious to get some shots as the leaves have passed their peak and are falling quick, making some really interesting splashes of color.

I spent last evening with my friends, the Daures, down in Stamford.  When we took a walk, I seriously regretted not bring my tripod as their neighborhood has some interesting turns and windy paths.  Needless to say, when I got home (ca 1:00) I was too psyched to go to sleep.  I grabbed my tripod and walked the neighborhood until 3 or so.  Here are some of the shots I’ve pulled off the cards so far.  More are on the way.

Norwalk, CT - Burning Tree - by Seth Perkins

Photographer : Gregory Crewdson

Gregory CrewdsonMy favorite thing to do at Barnes and Noble is to go to the photography section and build a massive stack of books.  I take them to someplace quiet and start flipping from back to front: loading up my imagination.  When I get full of one, I’ll move to someone different and just keep going back and forth until my brain is fully saturated. It was during one of these extended stays that I came across Gregory Crewdson’s book Twllight.

The cover grabbed me.  There was just something beautiful in the image of an Ophelia-like woman suspended in a mirror between the ordinary and surreal.  To me, it’s haunting in that way of a good movie or book: you leave the theatre, you finish the last sentence and still – the story continues replaying over and over in your head as you try to dig deeper and decipher every bit, look from every angle.  I love that feeling.  It’s the primary reason why I put David Lynch near the top of my director’s list : his stuff taps into me and the experience just keeps going weeks after I watch the movie.

 

Something has happened in his photos.  He creates the moment when, whether good or ill,something has transpired. I can’t help but be mesmerized by the mystery invoked.  I do not feel judgment, rather a surreal curiosity.  Many times his work carries that same kind of isolation and loneliness that I would see in Edward Hopper.  Curiosity becomes an almost voyeuristic fascination as we stand looking into a very private moment, oftentimes within the home itself.  Sometimes, I want to step through.  Sometimes, I just want to hold back and watch/listen; otherwise I might be too much the intruder.

You can read about Gregory Crewdson here, at Wikipedia.  His work is featured at the Luhring Augustine gallery.

 

Reach out and make a friend